The disqualification of Aidan Cassar from the Malta Eurovision Song Contest has sparked a heated debate about the role of social media in the music industry. The organizers of the festival have stated that Aidan broke the rules by uploading unauthorised social media posts, but many are questioning the logic behind such a strict policy.

Social media has become an integral part of the music industry, and for local musicians like Aidan, it is a crucial tool for promoting their work and connecting with fans. In today’s digital age, social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Spotify are essential for reaching a wider audience and building a fan base. They allow musicians to share their music, interact with fans, and promote upcoming shows and events.

For local musicians, social media is even more important. Without the backing of a major record label, they often have to rely on their own resources to promote their music. Social media provides an affordable and effective way for them to reach a wider audience and gain recognition.

The Malta Eurovision Song Contest is one of the most prestigious music competitions in the country, clearly one of the most followed with many peope almost obsesssed with it, and it is a great opportunity for local musicians to showcase their talent on a national and international stage. For Aidan, it was a chance to represent Malta at the Eurovision Song Contest, to be held in Liverpool, UK.

Aidan’s song Reń°ina, a song in Maltese, English and Spanish, was considered among the favourite songs to represent Malta at this year’s Eurovision Song Contest. The song was available on different platforms such as Spotify, YouTube, Facebook and Instagram. However, it was the uploads on social media platforms that got him disqualified.

The contest rules state that “The publication of any social media post, promotion material, interviews or media presence/exposure from the announcement of the quarter finalists onwards is strictly prohibited. Any breach of this clause will lead to automatic disqualification.” This rule seems to be a bit too harsh and it also raises the question as to why such a rule is in place in the first place.

The disqualification of Aidan Cassar is a blow to the music industry in Malta, and it highlights the need for a more flexible and logical approach to social media and music promotion. Social media is an essential tool for local musicians, and it should be embraced and encouraged, not banned.

Banning the use of social media is not the solution, it actually goes against the very basic principle of promoting music. The music industry is one of the most dynamic industries and it needs to adapt and change with the times. Social media is an integral part of the music industry, and it is essential for local musicians to be able to use it to promote their work.

The fact is, social media is used in everything nowadays, and it is no different in the music industry. Musicians are not the only ones who use social media, but also music managers, record labels, concert venues and fans. Social media has become the go-to place for music lovers to discover new music, and for musicians to connect with their fans.

In fact, a study by Nielsen Music found that social media plays a significant role in music discovery, with 44% of people discovering new music through social media. Spotify also has a huge role in music discovery and promotion, it has a vast library of songs, podcasts and podcasts which can be used to discover new songs, and it allows independent artists to upload their music and reach a larger audience.

The disqualification of Aidan Cassar is a reminder that music promotion is changing, and the industry needs to adapt and change with it. Social media is not just a tool for promotion, it is a way for musicians to connect with their fans and build a loyal following. The Malta Eurovision Song Contest organizers should rethink their approach to social media and music promotion, and find a way to embrace it instead of banning it.

I strongly believe that the disqualification of Aidan Cassar from the Malta Eurovision Song Contest for breaking festival regulations by uploading unauthorised social media posts raises important questions about the role of social media in the music industry. While it is understandable that the organisers want to maintain control over the promotion of the festival and the participating artists, the outright ban on social media use is not only unjust, but also goes against the logic of how the music industry operates in the modern age. Social media has become an integral part of the music industry, providing a platform for local artists to reach a wider audience, connect with fans, and promote their music. The disqualification of Aidan Cassar, one of Malta’s most popular singers, is a loss not only for the artist but also for the Maltese music scene as a whole. It is essential that organisers of music festivals and competitions recognise the value of social media in advancing local music and adapt their regulations to reflect this reality. The music industry is shifting, and it is important that the regulations that govern it shift with it, not against it.